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Tazkiratul Awliya Pdf Rapidsharel: A Must-Read Bangla Book for Spiritual Seekers


Bangla Book Tazkiratul Awliya Pdf Rapidsharel: A Treasure of Sufi Wisdom




If you are interested in learning about the lives and teachings of the Sufi saints and mystics, you should not miss the Bangla book Tazkiratul Awliya Pdf Rapidsharel. This book is a translation of the famous Persian work Tazkirat al-Awliya by Fariduddin Attar, one of the greatest Sufi poets and scholars of the 12th century.




Bangla Book Tazkiratul Awliya Pdf Rapidsharel


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Tazkirat al-Awliya means "The Memorial of the Saints" and it contains biographies and anecdotes of over 100 Sufi masters who lived between the 8th and 12th centuries. The book covers various aspects of Sufism, such as love, devotion, ethics, mysticism, miracles, and spiritual states. It also reveals the secrets of the Sufi path and the stages of spiritual progress.


The Bangla book Tazkiratul Awliya Pdf Rapidsharel is a rare and valuable resource for anyone who wants to explore the rich and diverse heritage of Sufism in Islam. You can download the book for free from the Internet Archive or from other online sources . You can also buy a printed copy from online bookstores.


Reading this book will inspire you to follow the footsteps of the Sufi saints and mystics who dedicated their lives to seeking God and serving humanity. You will also learn about the history and culture of Islam and how Sufism influenced various fields of knowledge and art.


The Influence of Sufism in Bangladesh




Sufism in Bangladesh is more or less similar to that in the whole Indian subcontinent. India, it is claimed, is one of the five great centers of Sufism, the other four being Persia (including central Asia), Baghdad, Syria, and North Africa. [14] Sufi saints flourished in India preaching the mystic teachings of Sufism that easily reached the common people, especially the spiritual truth seekers. [15]


Sufism in Bangladesh is also called pirism, after the pirs or teachers in the Sufi tradition [16] (also called Fakir). [17] The Sufis tremendously influenced the local population and thus these Sufi masters were the single most important factor in South Asian conversions to Islam, particularly in what is now Bangladesh. Most Bangladeshi Muslims are influenced to some degree by Sufism. The conversion to Islam of the population of what was to become Bangladesh began in the 13th century and continued for hundreds of years. Muslim pirs who wandered about in villages and towns were responsible for many conversions. [18]


A majority of Bangladeshi Muslims perceive Sufis as a source of spiritual wisdom and guidance and their Khanqahs and Dargahs as nerve centers of Muslim society. [19] These majority of Muslims in Bangladesh are Sunni, who mainly follow the Hanafi school of thought (madh'hab). [20] Sufis have been subject to religious violence in Bangladesh, part of a broader pattern of violence perpetrated by Islamists against Sufis, Shias, atheists, religious minorities, liberals and foreigners. [21]


The Sufi Saints in Bangladesh




Sufi saints in Bangladesh are revered as the pioneers of Islam and the spiritual guides of the Muslim community. They came from different regions and backgrounds, but they all shared a common goal of spreading the message of Islam and serving humanity. They also performed many miracles and divine activities that attracted people to their teachings. Some of the most famous Sufi saints who influenced Bangladesh are:


  • Shah Jalal: He was born in 1271 AD in Konya, Turkey, and belonged to the Naqshbandi order of Sufism. He came to India with his uncle Sheikh Kabir and later settled in Sylhet, Bangladesh, where he led a jihad against the Hindu king Gaur Govinda. He is credited with converting thousands of people to Islam and establishing many mosques and khanqahs in Sylhet. He died in 1346 AD and his tomb is a popular pilgrimage site for Muslims. [28]



  • Shah Makhdum Rupos: He was born in 1330 AD in Baghdad, Iraq, and belonged to the Qadiri order of Sufism. He came to India with his father Sheikh Ibrahim and later settled in Rajshahi, Bangladesh, where he preached Islam and performed many miracles. He died in 1409 AD and his tomb is a sacred place for Muslims. [29]



  • Khan Jahan Ali: He was born in 1389 AD in Delhi, India, and belonged to the Suhrawardi order of Sufism. He was a scholar, a poet, an architect and an administrator. He came to Bengal as a governor under Sultan Nasiruddin Mahmud Shah and later settled in Bagerhat, Bangladesh, where he built many mosques, tombs, bridges and roads. He died in 1459 AD and his tomb is a holy site for Muslims. [30]



  • Shah Amanat: He was born in 1668 AD in Sirajganj, Bangladesh, and belonged to the Chishti order of Sufism. He was a disciple of Shah Niyamatullah Wali and a teacher of Shah Abdul Karim. He preached Islam and performed many miracles in Chittagong, Bangladesh, where he died in 1734 AD. His tomb is a revered place for Muslims. [31]



  • Shah Paran: He was born in 1320 AD in Yemen and belonged to the Kubrawi order of Sufism. He was a nephew of Shah Jalal and accompanied him to Sylhet, Bangladesh, where he helped him in his jihad against Gaur Govinda. He later settled in Khadim Nagar, Sylhet, where he preached Islam and performed many miracles. He died in 1390 AD and his tomb is a sacred place for Muslims. [32]



  • Shah Mokhdum Mahisawar: He was born in 1340 AD in Baghdad, Iraq, and belonged to the Qadiri order of Sufism. He came to India with his father Sheikh Abdul Qadir Jilani and later settled in Pabna, Bangladesh, where he preached Islam and performed many miracles. He died in 1415 AD and his tomb is a holy place for Muslims. [33]



  • Baba Adam Shahid: He was born in 1375 AD in Delhi, India, and belonged to the Chishti order of Sufism. He came to Bengal as a soldier under Sultan Sikandar Shah and later settled in Munshiganj, Bangladesh, where he preached Islam and performed many miracles. He was martyred by Hindu fanatics in 1406 AD and his tomb is a sacred place for Muslims. [34]



The Sufism and Culture in Bangladesh




Sufism in Bangladesh has not only influenced the religious life of the people, but also their culture and society. Sufism has enriched the Bangla language and literature with its mystical and poetic expressions. Sufi literature is one of the major streams of medieval Bangla literature, which includes theological poems, spiritual songs, hagiographies and romances. Sufi poets such as Shah Muhammad Sagir, Syed Sultan, Sheikh Chand, Abdul Hakim, Haji Muhammad, Sheikh Mansur and Ali Raza wrote in Bangla to convey the message of Islam and Sufism to the masses. [35]


Sufism in Bangladesh has also influenced the music and art of the people. Sufi music is a popular genre of Bangla music, which consists of devotional songs that praise God and the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) and express love and longing for the divine. Sufi music is performed by singers and musicians who belong to different Sufi orders or traditions. Some of the famous Sufi singers in Bangladesh are Lalon Fakir, Radharaman Dutta, Hasan Raja, Kangal Harinath, Abbas Uddin Ahmed, Shah Abdul Karim and Bari Siddiqui. [36]


Sufism in Bangladesh has also inspired the art and architecture of the people. Sufi art is a form of Islamic art that reflects the mystical and spiritual aspects of Sufism. Sufi art includes calligraphy, painting, pottery, metalwork, woodwork and textile. Sufi art often uses geometric patterns, floral motifs, arabesques and symbols to represent the unity and diversity of God's creation. Sufi architecture is a form of Islamic architecture that reflects the functional and aesthetic needs of the Sufis. Sufi architecture includes mosques, khanqahs, tombs, shrines and bridges. Sufi architecture often uses domes, arches, minarets and courtyards to create a sense of harmony and beauty. [37]


The Sufism and Society in Bangladesh




Sufism in Bangladesh has not only influenced the religious life of the people, but also their society and economy. Sufis played a vital role in spreading Islam and establishing Muslim rule in Bengal. They also contributed to the social welfare and development of the people by providing education, health care, charity and justice. Sufis established many institutions such as khanqahs, madrasahs, mosques, tombs and bridges that served as centers of learning, worship, culture and administration. Sufis also promoted trade and commerce by traveling to different regions and countries and establishing contacts with other merchants and rulers. [38]


Sufism in Bangladesh has also fostered a sense of religious harmony and tolerance among the people of different faiths and sects. Sufis respected the diversity of beliefs and practices and did not impose their views on others. They also engaged in dialogue and interaction with other religious groups such as Hindus, Buddhists, Christians and Sikhs. Sufis adopted some elements of local culture and customs and incorporated them into their teachings and rituals. Sufis also composed songs and poems in Bangla that expressed the universal values of love, peace, justice and humanity. [39]


Sufism in Bangladesh has also faced some challenges and criticisms from various quarters. Some orthodox Muslims accused the Sufis of deviating from the true teachings of Islam and indulging in bid'ah (innovation) and shirk (polytheism). Some radical Islamists attacked the Sufis and their followers for being un-Islamic and heretical. Some secularists criticized the Sufis for being obscurantist and reactionary. Some modernists questioned the relevance of Sufism in the contemporary world. Despite these challenges, Sufism in Bangladesh has survived and thrived as a living tradition that continues to inspire and guide millions of people. [40]


The Sufism and Politics in Bangladesh




Sufism in Bangladesh has also been involved in the political sphere of the country. Sufis have supported and opposed different political parties and movements depending on their interests and ideologies. Sufis have also formed their own political parties and organizations to represent their views and demands. Sufis have also participated in various social and political movements such as the independence movement, the democracy movement, the anti-militancy movement and the secularism movement. [41]


Sufism in Bangladesh has also faced some challenges and opportunities in the political arena. Some challenges include the rise of radical Islamism, the erosion of secularism, the politicization of religion, the marginalization of minorities and the lack of good governance. Some opportunities include the demand for pluralism, the revival of Sufi traditions, the popularity of Sufi culture, the role of civil society and the support of international actors. [42]


Sufism in Bangladesh has also shown some potential and limitations in contributing to the democratization and development of the country. Some potential include the promotion of tolerance, moderation, dialogue, peace and social justice. Some limitations include the lack of political vision, organization, leadership and accountability. Sufis have also been accused of being opportunistic, sectarian, conservative and reactionary by some critics. [43]


Conclusion




In this article, we have explored the various aspects of Sufism in Bangladesh, such as its history, principles, practices, literature, culture, society and politics. We have seen how Sufism has influenced and been influenced by the faith, history and culture of Bangladeshi Muslims. We have also seen how Sufism has faced some challenges and opportunities in the contemporary context of Bangladesh. We have also seen how Sufism has shown some potential and limitations in contributing to the democratization and development of the country.


Sufism in Bangladesh is a rich and diverse tradition that reflects the complexity and diversity of Islam and Muslims in the world. Sufism in Bangladesh is not a monolithic or static phenomenon, but a dynamic and evolving one that responds to the changing times and circumstances. Sufism in Bangladesh is not a marginal or peripheral phenomenon, but a central and integral one that shapes and is shaped by the mainstream of Bangladeshi society. Sufism in Bangladesh is not a backward or outdated phenomenon, but a relevant and contemporary one that offers some insights and solutions to the modern problems and challenges.


Sufism in Bangladesh is a living tradition that continues to inspire and guide millions of people in their quest for spiritual fulfillment and social harmony. Sufism in Bangladesh is also a valuable resource that can be used to nurture, promote and protect pluralism, democracy and development in the country. Sufism in Bangladesh deserves more attention and appreciation from both scholars and practitioners of Islam and other religions. Sufism in Bangladesh can also serve as a bridge between different religious and cultural communities in the region and beyond. b99f773239


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